Psychological Trauma

Psychological trauma is a type of damage to the psyche that occurs as a result of a severely distressing event.
A traumatic event involves a single experience, or an enduring or repeating event or events, that completely overwhelm the individual’s ability to cope or integrate the ideas and emotions involved with that experience. The sense of being overwhelmed can be delayed by weeks, years or even decades, as the person struggles to cope with the immediate circumstances. Psychological trauma can lead to serious long-term negative consequences that are often overlooked even by mental health professionals: “If clinicians fail to look through a trauma lens and to conceptualize client problems as related possibly to current or past trauma, they may fail to see that trauma victims organize much of their lives around repetitive patterns of reliving and warding off traumatic memories, reminders, and affects.”

Trauma can be caused by a wide variety of events, but there are a few common aspects. There is frequently a violation of the person’s familiar ideas about the world, putting the person in a state of extreme confusion and insecurity. This is also seen when people or institutions, depended on for survival, violate or betray or disillusion the person in some unforeseen way.

That’s the government-sponsored psychological harassment operations described fairly accurately. It’s taken from the Wikipedia entry. There’s more there about potential causes (including the belief that one has some serious illness or actually having one–recall item 5 from the 1955 MKULTRA memo about giving people the signs and symptoms). It also states that some people don’t experience trauma after being exposed to the same events as others (see item 2 on increased mentation and sensory input, eg, throw in psychoactive drugs administered surreptitiously and you can better ensure that they do).

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