The Rage Gun

You’re gonna regret this.
It’s your big fall…

–“Entrapment” by Chicago-based punk band Naked Raygun

I’ve covered these experiences before, but I’m going to take another run at it with them together in light of the Facebook study and the latest denial of connection to the Department of Defense’s MINERVA programs:

Guardian, “Facebook denies emotion contagion study had government and military ties: Researchers say the study was not funded by Minerva Research Initiative, which engaged scientists in national security issues,” Samuel Gibbs, 4 July 2014:

theguardian.com/technology/2014/jul/04/facebook-denies-emotion-contagion-study-government-military-ties

Note that this is exactly the kind of thing they’ve been studying for many decades. It is not new, we are not in R&D phase, the Arab Spring was most likely one result of it as likely is the rise in violence in the United States.

Which is the point. Why did CIA and DoD work together on MKULTRA? If you can kill one person and make it look like a heart attack, can that be extended to an entire battlefield? Mass aerosol or spray fish toxin can work as a poor man’s neutron bomb as easily as the assassination of one individual.

Similar with behavioral modification research conducted since PAPERCLIP. If you can degrade enemy soldier efficiency, can you also increase friendly soldier efficiency? On the smaller scale, degrade an individual dissenter and improve an individual controlled for propaganda?

One way to degrade or deny a dissenter, and thereby degrade movements as a whole is entrapment. We know from films like Serpico and news stories all over the place how these things were done in the 1950s and after. It is here where I typically find myself at odds with people who would otherwise be allies. Their thinking is still in the 20th Century, fifty to sixty years out of date and that’s just on simple individual psychological and mass sociological manipulation. Extend it to neuroscience and they switch you off, tune you out entirely.

That’s why I’m going to drag you, my friends, kicking and screaming by the eyebrows into the 21st Century. If you don’t start realizing–and most importantly acknowledging–the improvements made to this system, you may as well be chasing your own tail, running in circles. At the very least, I can say that things have gotten increasingly creepy, sinister, and mysterious enough so that some portion of the things I wrote two years ago may not fall on quite such deaf ears as they did then. This is the result of normalcy bias. As things get more bizarre and people start noticing, they start looking for cause-effect. The sometimes silly justifications for much of the past’s oddities in the news are now not even attempted except by outlets squarely within the government mouthpiece media sector. That’s progress, but is it sufficient? Is it happening fast enough? Or is the research headed for a singularity that even if it all came pouring fourth ten seconds from now, it would be too late.

Think of it as now knowing that your houseguest has a handgun. Knowing it is one step. Neutralizing it without the benefit of body armor is another.

Yet, I push–I mean pull–forward.

“Ouch!”

Your brow could use some plucking anyway.

The first time I recall being aware of something amiss was one of my former bosses. He was one of the most calm people I’ve ever known. We often dealt with high stress environments, schedules and budgets requiring adherence to in order to succeed in getting places ready to occupy. When these things were out of whack, there could be finger pointing, name calling, scapegoating. Yet, my boss was always there as the voice of reason, calmly and logically walking the situation back while defusing it and turning it back from the personal to the professional.

And yet when the Squidgate situation arose, he sometimes was so angry that his hands shook. I wound up taking a week’s vacation in January of 2010 just because I thought I was the cause and he needed a break from me for his health. Now I know better.

The next time came when, I think Spring or Summer of 2011, I was alone in the apartment on University in Minneapolis when I suddenly became angry. It wasn’t as if I didn’t have plenty of reasons to be royally pissed off–I did and still do. It was that just before that, I was relatively calm and having an otherwise dull day.

The anger became so overwhelming that I decided to take a walk. As I headed up the stairs to the first floor I saw, not twenty feet ahead of me, my former neighbor from when I lived on that floor in Apartment 13. Now as much curious as ticked off, I followed him. He walked through the rear parking lot and around a corner to a backyard garage of a nearby property.

Then he started hitting himself in the head.

I got him to explain the situation. There were many details–all of which are completely irrelevant. He and his wife had gotten into an argument and he was so angry that this was the result.

What they were arguing about does not matter. As I’ve stated time and again, sometimes–even under normal circumstances, without outside interference–emotions come along and then we decided what it is that prompted it. It might just be an adrenaline rush that we then try to assign a cause to. One day, people will consider this stupid and superstitious. Neuroscience is already telling us that most decisions are made unconsciously and that we only guess why we made them consciously afterwards.

People do not work the way that they think that they do. They just don’t.

But why both myself and the couple at the same time? Obvious answer: it was some outside cause.

The next one is where it gets even more interesting.

I was waiting for my roommate/former boyfriend at the grocery store. We were still speaking even though things were quickly disintegrating and it would result in my having to call 9-1-1 because he threatened to kill me in my sleep the final night in that apartment and I had a long drive the next day {where I’d also discover that the longterm ex had lied about the date and gotten married just a day or three before on Facebook}.

Anyway, while waiting for him near the entrance, I waved and called out. The policeman assigned to the store–whom I had seen many times before and had seemed as sane as anyone else which I grant isn’t saying much–came over repeating “What?!? What?!? What?!?” with a crazy look on his face. He tugged on his sidearm, as if to say, “Give me an excuse to shoot this place up!”

At that moment I suddenly had a deep desire to punch him in the face. I don’t know quite how close I came. But I managed to point in the roomie’s general direction, then, while his back was to me, I slipped out of the store and shouted obscenities at nothing at all to release that sudden onset of rage.

Why do I bring all of this up now?

See the latest from Barrett Brown:

Front/Burner-D Magazine, “The Barrett Brown Review of Arts and Letters and Jail: A Visit to the Hole,” Barrett Brown, 1 July 2014:

frontburner.dmagazine.com/2014/07/01/the-barrett-brown-review-of-arts-and-letters-and-jail-a-visit-to-the-hole/

There’s the extreme heat. There’s his roommate. There’s the stuff I’ve been talking about. There’s the scumbag public and private spook sector that knows how to arrange things.

Now, if I’m right–or even just potentially right–does it matter why BB is in lockup?

No. It does not.

Jeezy-wheezy on a f—ing popsickle stick, covert ops always have a cover story. That’s basic covert ops. 101. Beginners. Amateurs. Basic information.

Think magic tricks: just because you don’t know how it’s done, just because you cannot see the strings, just because you don’t want to appear paranoid, does not mean that there are not strings, does not mean that there isn’t something nefarious, doesn’t mean that even if it were all a string of coincidences–it isn’t, promise you–that they wouldn’t still try to take advantage of the situation.

Do I know how it works? No. Do I know that it does? F— yes.

Please wake up.

Have you ever been in a situation where the last thing you want to do is let your enemies know they are bothering you, and yet at the same time needing very much to scream “HELP!”? I have.

And I don’t even care how Barrett sees the situation. This is how I see it and I don’t give a damn what people think of me saying so.

In an entirely unrelated matter, I have abstained from complaining about the PayPal14 while still on occasion helping to call for financial support and raising awareness about them.

I have tried my best to defuse the troubles surrounding the perception and desires regarding “dumping” the Snowden document trove and all the side issues related to that.

I have tried my best to be supportive and do what I think is best.

Note I don’t say “the right thing to do” in terms of morals. Just the best thing to do in terms of effectiveness and beating the cloak-and-dagger-fascist-abomination back downstairs and into the goddam basement, chained and locked, where it belongs. Pragmatism based on history.

I’m not sure why I wrote all that.

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