Saucy Jack

There have been several people dismissed recently from the APA with regards to aiding, abetting, and protecting the CIA’s and Department of Defense’s torture program. As I’ve noted recently, there are almost certainly other items the APA has worked with the intelligence community to try to achieve. As the Red Scare was the excuse for abuses that lead to the Church/Tower and other hearings, so it the global war on terror the excuse today. We’ve already seen proof that so many other programs have been reinstated, sometimes even “legalized” by Congress, that we were told in the 1970s were illegal and were assured would never happen again. Opening mail, mass surveillance, spying on and harassing journalists and others, assassination by drone, torture/interrogation/brainwashing, and human experimentation have all been shown to have been occurring since 9/11 {and some of it even before}. How likely is it then that MKULTRA and COINTELPRO have been overlooked?

I’ve written about this before, so this is more of a refresher. The idea of using psychopaths in the service of “government” or multinational corporations is not new. Nor did it begin with the work of Peter Watts:

Rifters II: Maelstrom

Rifters III: Behemoth

But he is good at making the motives and possibilities clear in fiction, taking the ideas of experts and other science fiction writers and running with it. In these two books, a character named Achilles Desjardins is used as a drone pilot. Typical assignments include containing outbreaks of diseases and rebellion via deadly flying robots. He is controlled largely with drugs, until that all goes horribly wrong.

Now, let us recall that the Secretary of Defense was unable to say with any certainty when asked by Congress that the domestic drone rollout which transpired last year would not be used against the American people. Let’s also recall the much-ado about why/should various commercial airlines have been shot down on 9/11. Then, if you really want to dig deep, recall that the original OPERATION NORTHWOODS called for shooting down a plane full of American college students in order to build support for an invasion of Cuba; after being criticized, the modified plan called for shooting down a plane full of dead bodies.

If there’s one meme that must be dispensed with, it is that anyone in power wakes up wondering how they can help the average citizen. That is not what power does, it is not what it thinks about. Rather, how to exploit them is foremost in Power’s mind.

Enter Dick Cheney’s “Walk on the Dark Side.” The speech in which he used the phrase was rather vague in terms of details. But consider this:

Ted “Unabomber” Kaczynski was a CIA test subject. Notorious mobster “Whitey” Bulger was a test subject. Though I have in the past considered him more of an after-the-fact subject of study, Aquarius {though not very accurate historically} has reminded me just how deeply Charles Manson was in the LSD subculture–LSD having been invented on behalf of and extensively tested by the CIA. I may have to rethink that. Lois Lang, shooter of a CIA bag man, was also involved in behavioral modification studies. Multiple MKULTRA subprojects were dedicated to mental illness, and psychopathy in particular.

How then, can one ignore the possibility–probability!–that some thinktank wrote that there should be some manner of harnessing the many serial killers roaming free inside the United States and using them in the war on terror? In an era of mass surveillance? It seems only logical when you want to build a spook army to look for talent who is already good at getting away with murder.

Is there any other basis, apart from the psychological profile of the parties involved and historical precedent, for this idea? Of course there is. The stats on serial killers by the national expert:

Christopher Beam, “The Decline of the Serial Killer,” Slate, 5 January 2011:

slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/crime/2011/01/blood_loss.html

Statistics on serial murder are hard to come by—the FBI doesn’t keep numbers, according to a spokeswoman—but the data we do have suggests serial murders peaked in the 1980s and have been declining ever since. James Alan Fox, a criminology professor at Northeastern University and co-author of Extreme Killing: Understanding Serial and Mass Murder, keeps a database of confirmed serial murderers starting in 1900. According to his count, based on newspaper clippings, books, and Web sources, there were only a dozen or so serial killers before 1960 in the United States. Then serial killings took off: There were 19 in the 1960s, 119 in the ’70s, and 200 in the ’80s. In the ’90s, the number of cases dropped to 141. And the 2000s saw only 61 serial murderers. (Definitions of serial murder” vary, but Fox defines it as “a string of four or more homicides committed by one or a few perpetrators that spans a period of days, weeks, months, or even years.” To avoid double-counting, he assigns killers to the decade in which they reached the midpoint of their careers.)

There are plenty of structural explanations for the rise of reported serial murders through the 1980s. Data collection and record-keeping improved, making it easier to find cases of serial murder. Law enforcement developed more sophisticated methods of investigation, enabling police to identify linkages between cases—especially across states—that they would have otherwise ignored. The media’s growing obsession with serial killers in the 1970s and ’80s may have created a minor snowball effect, offering a short path to celebrity.

And any indication of APA involvement? Yes:

Spencer Ackerman, “Psychologist accused of enabling US torture backed by former FBI chief: Louis Freeh calls report that preceded Stephen Behnke’s ousting from the American Psychological Association leadership a ‘gross mischaracterization’,” Guardian, 12 July 2015:

Behnke has longstanding connections to the FBI. His CV cites his work since 2001 on an FBI child-abduction and serial murder research advisory panel. A John D Behnke, who appears to be his brother, served as a long-time and distinguished FBI agent before joining Freeh’s risk-management firm as a managing director.

Certainly, FBI being retooled to being more Jack Bauer and less Will Graham {and “coincidentally” less interested in fraud committed by banks, for example} could have had something to do with the decline. Assume for a moment, for the sake of argument, that the 2000s should have +/-120 serial killers. Let’s say 20 were found suitable and recruited by the intelligence community for training and special ops. What about the other 40?

USA Today, “Series Of Missing Ohio Women Stirs Fears Of Serial Killer,” WFMY News, 25 June 2015:

wfmynews2.com/story/news/crime/2015/06/25/ohio-serial-killer/29266757/

That town in Ohio is just one of several places with similar issues. Who is the most likely target of serial killers?

20150714NotH
It’s a stereotype for a reason.

The idea then? Local police get sex workers “removed.” They also {with or without the help of the killer} can frame any local criminal they please with the crimes and get them put away as well. It becomes a win-win for a misguided, holier-than-thou, superstitious, fear-mongering and -infested system that also “just happens” to love money and power more than anything else.

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